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Famous Folk Dance: "Chau"
 
The traditions of Indian dance and dance dramas are among the most perplexingly complex and varied theatrical cultures of the world. The geographical vastness, different ecological conditions, multiplicity of races and their languages, the complex religious beliefs and ritual practices and equally intricate social structure have all contributed in creating the most colorful panorama of dance and dance drama traditions.
Among the neo classical dance and dance dramas like Bharatanatyam, Kathak, Kuchipudi, Odissi, Kathakali and a few more, Chau, the rare mask dances of eastern India are quite unique. 
It is difficult to ascertain the antiquity of these three major forms of Chau but surely this region, as noted by several ancient scriptures, was one of the most arduous areas to penetrate by an outsider. The thick forests and the hilly region inhabited by the "hostile tribals" made it impossible for anyone to trespass. The near paucity of written record or incomplete historical account compels us to accept some 'reconstructed' notes that mention about the local and a few Hindu chieftains who gradually established their sovereignty within the small pockets of this region after 12-14 century A.D. and slowly influenced the life and customs of the native tribals. Today layers of these influences accumulated over centuries are discernible in the cultural activities of these tribals. Today layers of these influences accumulated over centuries are discernible in the cultural activities of these tribals.  
The tribal belt where the tribals and other common people perform Chau dances is distributed into three adjoining states, Bengal, Bihar and Orissa, after the dissolution of the princely states in 1950.  
The three forms of Chau are named after the district or village where they are performed, i.e. the Purulia Chau of Bengal, the Seraikella Chau of Bihar and the Mayurbhanj Chau of Orissa. Surprisingly the earlier writers have exercised considerably to understand the origin of the word Chau and to ascertain its classical origin as also they have tried to establish the origin of the word Chau from Sanskrit root word ''Chaya'', while others have tried to justify its martial base and the derivation of the word by suggesting that the word Chau is derived from the local dialect meaning an army camp. However, they have overlooked the outcries of the performers or the drummers during performance. Particularly in Purulia, the singer drummer often rushes to the new characters "by shouting "cho... cho...cho..." with excitement, before they enter into the arena. By doing this he infuses the same enthusiasm in the dancer. During the course of the performance also such excitement and outburst of joy are expressed by the singers and other members of orchestra. Similarly this author heard the same utterances by the hunters who assemble at a particular hill top during the annual hunting expeditions on the full moon day in the month of May. While chasing the game exclaim they exclaim "cho... cho...cho..." (A broader pronunciation of Chau), in order to fright the animals or invoke the spirit of animal for easier gain of the game. Most likely it is this word associated with the natives' earliest hunting occupation that is now associated with their dances to express joy and excitement.

Due to lack of sustained patronage and guidance, Purulia Chau show very little evolvement since its hunting or warfare origin. Performed by the early inhabitants of this arid region, it is almost an antithesis of sophisticated and stylized Seraikella form. 
Brief and simple rituals precede the dance performed that is conducted in front of a Shiva temple or the village square. The village head is the patron and he carries a brass pitcher on his head to his house where his wife sprinkles the water of the pitcher on the newly harvested crop. Later, in the month, around 14th of May more elaborate rituals are offered to the sun god. Many devotees observe austerities including piercing their bodies with iron hook. On a high poll they are suspended and whirled round on 'chadak' to suggest the progression of the sun in different constellations throughout the year. Till the early decades of this century these dancers and the form were patronized by the Bagmundi ruler, but due to unproductive land and ever failing rains the ruler could hardly provide necessary support. The performers too were forced to migrate to nearby urban city like Calcutta in search of living. 
Since 1961, when this form was first witnessed by an anthropologist in a remote village of Purulia district and their subsequent visits in major cities world over, the locals have formed their own 'parties' in anticipation of a sponsored trip abroad. They have added more 'exciting' combat scenes with more skillful pirouettes and summersault. The costumes specially the headgears have acquired enormous size and jazzy decorations. Influenced by the more respected Hindu culture the natives adopted the epical themes but they naturally opted for the warfare scenes that would reflect their life of perpetual hardships and conflict with nature itself. Even the characters the noble and heroic characters like Rama and Sita are depicted with forceful gestures. During the festival time a special flask shaped dancing arena is prepared where several dancing 'parties' assemble to perform. Two or more 'dhamsa' or kettle drum players and equal or number of drummers accompany the groups. The tune is provided by a Bo like wind instrument called Marui. Unlike Seraikella Chau here the chief drummer sings the introductory song or renders rhythmic passages during the performance. After introduction of a heroic character when he enters the arena he runs to and fro several times in the narrow passage before commencing his dance or dialogue with other characters. On the other hand a demonic character takes several vigorous turns or summersaults and turns to sections of spectators for recognition and applause for his skill and virility. Such skillful acrobatic feats proliferate every year leaving the researcher completely amused for their innovative skills in improvising such exciting sequences. 
As you enter Chorida, a small village in Purulia district during Chau season, the village that provides some of the best masks, practically every house and every member of the household is seen occupied in making masks or assembling decorations for headgears. The process of making mask is nearly the same; however, due to thick layers of clay, paper and mud these masks are heavier than the Seraikella masks. Moreover the eyes on these masks are wide open, although the air passage of nostrils is very narrow. The demonic nature of a character is ascertained by the knitted eyebrows and thick hair growth on the face by pasting jute fibers.

Thus the variety of masks in this form is equally or more varied than the Seraikella masks even though the thematic content is limited to epical stories.
Chhau seems to be a generic name of a group of stylistically varying dances. It ranges from simple folk to highly evolved styles. All these styles of dances are called Chhau. To distinguish one from the other the use of an epithet has now become inevitable. The three most representative styles of chhau have as their epithets the names of the places where they developed under the patronage of the respective feudal nobility. They are known as Seraikelaa Chhau, Mayurbhanj Chhau, and Purulia Chhau, and the degree of sophistication which they acquired in the feudal courts is in that descending order. Although they differ stylistically from one another, they have many similarities. The most important and significant similarity is that they are called simply by the generic name: Chhau. We have given the epithets for our convenience.
A generic name usually points to the root character of the class it denotes. The character, even after any degree of evolvement, remains an integral part of the class either overtly or as an underlying base. And if various styles of dances known as chhau are analyzed, it is found that they all have martial strains. The word 'chhau', now obsolete, means to attack stealthily. The basic steps and gaits of Seraikelaa and Mayurbhanj styles of chhau not only are practiced holding a sword and a shield, the rudimentary dance are known as ruk-maar-naaclia (meaning the dance of attack and defense) in Mayurbhanj and phari-khandaa-khela (meaning the play with the sword and shield) in Seraikelaa. In Asanapaat, a village in Orissa one can find a dance called paaikaali, that is unmistakably the mother of chhau because the leg extensions are exactly like that of chhau and they perform a kind of attack and defense dance almost like ruk-maar-naacha. The musical instruments used in paaikaali are exactly the same as those of chhau. In Orissa the soldiers were being called paaika-s. Therefore, chhau in its origin was unmistakably a weapon-dance or a war dance. 
Even the use of masks in Seraikelaa Chhau and Purulia Chhau, and in their less evolved folk versions, does not disprove the assumption, but rather strengthens it. Otto Bihalji-merin in his Mask of the World writes, "A mask dance is often preliminary for war. The dancers portray in pantomime the actions they plan, sneaking up to the enemy, javelin throwing, close combat and finally victory. This serves as a magic spell, as physical exercise, as spiritual preparation, and at the same time as conquest of fear through the anticipation of victory. The helmets of classical antiquity were also masks of fear and magical protection. Greek helmets had fixed visors with eyeholes. During the bloody gladiatorial combats in the Roman arenas the swordsman (hoplomachus) confronted with the net man (retiarius) wore a helmet a wire-netting visor to protect his face."
Chhau then in its formative period in a primitive culture was not only a war dance but also a ritual meant for spiritual preparation, and at the same time as the conquest of conquest of fear, through the anticipation ofvictory. May be because of this, the religious associations and rituals connected with the three styles of evolved chhau have so many similarities. Another very significant similarity among the three styles is that the dances as well as the rituals connected with them culminates in a festival on the last day of the lunar month of Chaitra, corresponding to April 12th. The deities worshipped in the religious rituals are Shiva and Shakti. This leads us to believe that the tantric cult has greatly influenced chhau during its formative period. A tradition is always more like a river than a lake. It is not an accumulation but a flow. And when it flows it accepts many inflows. These tributaries do not change the individuality of the art form but they surely leave their mark. When chhau originated it was war dance and as such was basically ritualistic in character. The rituals of a primitive culture have great similarity with that of the tantric cult. Tantra differs from primitive phallic cult only in the sense that it has highly evolved ontological superstructure, which transformed the myths behind rituals by deepening them with mystic symbolization. Many rituals connected with chhau resemble those of the fertility cult. The primitive culture that gave birth to rudimentary chhau was surely as much concerned with fertility as with victory in war. Both were inter-linked in the sense that both were essential for the sustenance of a tribe or community. And religion was a factor that integrated the 
Various aspects of life into a unified whole. Therefore in primitive culture everything concerning life beginning from eating and drinking to fighting a war has religious association.
A very marked similarity is found in the music that accompanies the various styles of chhau. The percussion is both powerful and dominating and is shared by a variety of drums of which Dhol and Dhumsaa (also called dhaak) are most essential. The embellishment provided by a short cylindrical drum called Chadchadi and a small hemispherical drum called Tikraa, are sometimes dispensed with in some of the styles of chhau. Again, between Dhol and Dhumsaa, the former leads. Dhol is virtually the kingpin of a chhau performance. It not only fills the dancer with rhythmic inspiration but also is the main weaver of the fascinating percussive tapestry of chhau music. While Dhol gives the character to chhau music, the powerful, reverberating beats of Dhumsaa underlines its virile personality.
If the three styles of chhau are closely examined it would be revealed that they are as much forms of dancing as forms of theatre. Of course, through dance movements, they narrate the story or theme contained in each number, yet the overpowering theatricality is unmistakable.
According to Brecht, the great theatre thinker and playwright of Germany, who has profoundly influenced the contemporary theatre directors and actors, the main business of theatre is the exposition of the story and its communication by suitable means of alienation. Elegant movements coupled with graceful groupings have enough potentiality to alienate and inventive miming greatly helps in exposing and communicating the story. Viewed from this Brechtian angle chhau is primarily a form of theatre in which dancing is the most dominant means of alienation, like that of Kathakali.
From the perspective of Indian aesthetics, Brechtlan alienation comes very close to the naatyadharmee style of presentation. Both the terms mean the depiction of an event in a non-realistic and unfamiliar light intended to dissuade the spectator from identifying himself with any of the dramatic personae and to induce him to regard the event of the performance with critical detachment. If a spectator is identified with the character he will go through the same emotional experience which is likely to cloud his sensibility. The purpose of this 'detachment' is, however, different. While the naatyadharmee presentation aims at giving a taste of rasa, the aesthetic relish, and the Brechtian alienation aims at pure intellectual awareness. 
Even if the Indian view were taken into chhau, like Kathakali, would fall under the category of naatya than nritya. Chhau then, in a sense is a form of traditional Indian dance-theatre. In this form of theatre the actors express themselves in movement, not in words. Therefore, all the three styles of chhau have the character of a non-verbal dance-theatre.
Each of the three styles of chhau has its own scheme of stylization so that the characteristic movements become adequately expressive to carry the theme dramatically. The most marked difference among the three styles is in the use of mask. The Seraikelaa and Purulia styles of chhau use masks whereas Mayurbhanj Chhau uses none. Again, masks used in Seraikelaa Chhau have a totally different function and stylization to those of Purulia Chhau.
The use of mask in Seraikelaa Chhau not only determined its growth but also remained its focal point. The masks of Seraikelaa Chhau are more sophisticated in both concept and design than the masks of Purulia Chhau. The uniqueness of Seraikelaa Chhau is that these neutralized masks become expressive during the course of dance. The same mask with different modes of stance, gestures, and positioning of the body may, at times express great anguish and at another time joy and happiness. The masks of Purulia Chhau, on the other hand, vibrate with a quality of earthiness and their function is mainly to heighten the theatricality. 
The masks are invariably integrated with towering headgear that gives them a resplendent touch. These masks give the larger-than-life mythological characters a fascinating palpability.

Without masks Mayurbhanj Chhau dancer and actors have more freedom for movement. Therefore, Mayurbhanj Chhau excels in choreography, especially during group numbers. In this style of chhau the movements alone become visual poetry.
Since all the chhau dances, ranging from the simple folk to highly evolved, belong to the same family, each should have love and appreciation for the other styles and not a feeling of superiority over others. Each style has its own charm and aesthetic appeal. They are all fascinating in their own way and together they amply enrich the performing art heritage of this country.

 

 

Historical Background of Purulia District

Jaina Bhagavati-Sutra of circa 5th century A.D. mentions that Purulia was one of the 16 Mahajanapadas and was a part of the country known as Vajra-bhumi in ancient times. However, little is known about Purulia before the East-India Company obtained the 'Diwani' of Bengal, Bihar, Orissa in 1765. By Regulation XVIIII of 1805, a Jungle Mahals district composed of 23 parganas and mahals including the present Purulia (known as 'Purulia' those days) was formed. By Regulation XIII of 1833 the Jungle Mahals district was broken up and a new district called Manbhum was constituted with headquarters at Manbazar. The district was very large in size and included parts of Bankura, Burdwan of present West Bengal and Dhanbad, Dhalbhum, Saraikela and Kharswan of present states of Jharkhand and Orissa. In 1838 the district headquarters was transferred to Purulia of today. Since the formation of the district it was withdrawn from regular administration and placed under an officer called Principal Assistant to the agent to the Governor-General for South-Western Frontier. The title of the officer Principal Agent was later changed to Deputy Commissioner by Act XX of 1854. Finally in 1956 Manbhum district was partitioned between Bihar and West Bengal under the States Reorganization Act and the Bihar and West Bengal (Transfer of Territories) Act 1956 and the present district Purulia was born on 1st November, 1956.

Purulia is the westernmost district of West Bengal with all-India significance because of its tropical location, its shape as well as function like a funnel. It funnels not only the tropical monsoon current from the Bay to the subtropical parts of north-west India, but also acts as a gateway between the developed industrial belts of West Bengal and the hinterlands in Orissa, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and Uttarpradesh. For its convenient location, this place has acquired an important place in the tourist map in India.

 

 


 
 

Education

Literacy percentage of this district is 56.14 % (excluding 0-6 years population). The male literacy percentage is 74.18% and female literacy percentage is 37.15 %. In rural and urban areas the literacy percentages are 53.82 and 75.96 respectively. The male literacy percentage has been increased from 62.17 % in 1991 to 74.18% in 2001. The female literacy has been increased form 23.24 %in 1991 to 37.15% in 2001. In case of rural areas female literacy has been increased to 14.34 % over 1991 and in urban areas it is 7.36 % over 1991.

Pre-Primary

(a) No. of sanctioned Anganwadi Centres –2512
 (b) No. of functioning Anganwadi Centres- 2392
 (c) Pre Schooling under ICDS  -2392
 (d) Total Students in these centers – 104442 ( Boys-52969, Girls-51473)
 (e) Privately managed Pre School – 17
 (f) Total Students in these centers – 862
 (g) Total Teacher in 17 Schools –

192 numbers of Sishu Siksha Kendras distributed over 10 blocks are functioning.

Primary

  

1. Primary Schools sanctioned  - 2998
2. Primary Schools functioning – 2971 (DPSC-2963, MM-8,)
(Upper Primary – 329, One room school-697, Two-room school-1141)
3.No. of Teachers- 6042 ( Male 4822, Female-1220 )
4.No. of Trained Teacher –3616 (  Male 3140, Female-476 )
5.No. of Un-trained Teacher –2426 (  Male 1682, Female-744 )
6.Enrollment of Students – 258596 (Boys-140060, Girls- 111536)
7.No. of building less Schools – 80
8.No. of Kucha /Thached building schools-335
9.School with no drinking water facility – 1028
10.School with no toilet facility –2872
11.One Teacher Schools-819
12.Percentage of dropout from Class I to Class IV –43.16 %
(Class-I to II-20.36 %, II to III-15.78 %, III to IV -15.25 %)
13.Children Out of Schools- 79394   

Secondary

1.No. of Jr. High Schools- 93
2.No. of Jr. Madrasah- 04
3.No. of  High Schools- 144
4.Sr/High Madrasah – 01
5.Higher Secondary –86
5.Enrollment of Students –174357
6.No. of Teachers – 4060 ( Male-3352 , Female- 708 )

Post Literacy Programme

The Post Literacy Campaign started in 1996-97. The evaluation of the post Literacy Campaign already completed in July 2002.  Total no. of current learners are 166663. Out of these learners 114481 nos. achieved NLM norms. Percentage of current learners in the sample achieved NLM norms 68.69%.

At present District possesses 11 Degree colleges, one B.Ed. College (Purulia), one Polytechnic College (Purulia) and one Industrial Training Institute (Raghunathpur). 
 

 

 

Industry  

Large Scale Industries

The District has only two Large Scale Units. One is Santaldih Thermal Power Plant at Santaldih and other is Damodar Cement Factory, Madhukunda. One major Unit, i.e., Pumped Storage Project at Bagmundi with generation capacity of 4x 225 MW is under construction stage.

Existing /Proposed Medium Scale Industries

Although no large scale industry has started during the past one year, the West Bengal Incentive Scheme 2000 coupled with the strenuous efforts of the district administration over the last two years has started paying dividend. During the last one and half year the district has received investment of Rs. 306.17 crores in the manufacturing sector mainly in the sponge Iron sector. This compares favorably with more developed districts. The medium scale industries already set up or proposed to be set up are as follows.

Name of Unit

Location

Investment
(in Lakhs)

Capacity
(In TPA)

Employment

Implemented / Proposed

Sponge Iron Industry

Purvanchal Sponge Iron Pvt. Ltd

Neturia

6300

60000

100

Implemented

Maa Chinnamastika Steel & Power Ltd.

Neturia

1600

30000

70

Implemented

Mark Steel

Santuri

1665

30000

100

Implemented

Vision Sponge Iron Pvt. Ltd.

Santuri

4984

60000

120

Proposed

Vikas Metal Pvt. Ltd.

Santuri

6683

65000

419

Proposed

Raghuveer Steel & Power Ltd.

Neturia

1200

30000

40

Proposed

Orrisa Iron Ore Ltd.

Kashipur

550

15000

40

Proposed

BISCO Sponge Iron Pvt. Ltd.

Balarampur

5500

60000

300

Proposed

Balaji Steel

Balarampur

155

13000

15

Proposed

Bravo Sponge Iron

Para

980

90000

70

Proposed

Maa Kali Steel Ugyog

Tamna, Purulia

 

30000

258

Proposed

Balaji Muneral Industries

Balarampur

258

12000

40

Proposed

Non-Metallic Mineral Product

M/s Purulia Cement Pvt. Ltd

Shimulia, Purulia

1000

 

97

Implemented

ISCO track sleeper Pvt. Ltd.

Anara

500

 

45

Implemented

Haldia Downstream Project

Kushal Polysacks Pvt. Ltd.

 Jhalda

300

 

40

Implemented


 

 

 


 
 

Important Telephone Numbers
 

Administration, Purulia

 

Designation

Telephone No.

District Magistrate

Office 03252-222302
Res.   03252-222301
Fax    03252-222490

Additional District Magistrate( G)

Office 03252-222120
Res.   03252-222622

Additional District Magistrate (D)

Office 03252-223141
Res.   03252-223259

S.D.O. (East)

Office 03252-223266

S.D.O. (West)

Office 03252-223263
Res.   03252-223229

District Planning Officer

03252-222169

O/c, Election

03252-222003

Senior Deputy Collector

Office 03252-222606
Res.   03252-224944

Nezarat Deputy collector

03252-223271

Additional District Relief Officer

03252-223675

District Panchayet & Rural Dev. Officer

03252-222695

G.M, S.C. & S.T. Finance Corporation

03252-222901

District Programme Officer, I.C.D.S.

03252-223278

District Social Welfare Officer

03252-223278

R.T.O.

03252-222186

Project Director, D.R.D.C.

03252-222294 / 574

District Controller, F & S

03252-222213

Treasury Officer

03252-222132

Additional Treasury Officer

- do -

Additional Treasury Officer

- do -

District Youth Officer

03252-224742

District Land & Land Acquisition Officer

03252-223120 / 259

Deputy District Land & Land Acquisition Officer

03252-222554

Special Land Acquisition Officer

- do -

Additional Land Acquisition Officer

- do -

D.C.F.S, Purulia

03252-222213

Project Officer, Backward Class Welfare Deptt

03252-222453

District Employment Exchange Officer, Purulia

03252-222118

The G.M, District Industries Centre

03252-222352

District Youth Officer

03252-224742

Purulia Zilla Parishad

Designation

Tel No.

Sabhadhipati, Purulia Zilla Parishad

Office 03252-222255
Res.  03252-222358

Saha - Sabhadhipati, Purulia Zilla
 Parishad

 

Additional Executive Officer, Purulia
Zilla Parishad

Office 03252-222537
Res.  03252-226556

Secretary, Purulia Zilla Parishad

Office 03252-226045
Res.  03252-228363

 Deputy Secretary, Purulia Zilla
Parishad

Office 03252-222537
Res.  03252-224792

District Engineer, Purulia
 Zilla Parishad

Office  03252-226030

Karmadhakhya, Purta O Paribahan
Sthayee  Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Sikhya Sanskriti, Tathya,
 Krira Sthayee Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

Res. 03253-255122

Karmadhakhya, Jana Sathya O Paribesh
Sthayee  Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Khadhya O Sarbaraha Sthayee
Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Bon O Bhumi Sanskar  Sthayee
Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Shishu Nari Unnayan, Tran O
Janakalyan Sthayee Samiti, , PZP

 

Karmadhakhya, Krishi Sech O Samabay Sthayee
Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Khudra Shilpa, Vidyut Achiracharit 
Shakti Sthayee Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Karmadhakhya, Prani Sampad, Matsya Bikas Sthayee
Samiti, , Purulia Zilla Parishad

 

Information

Designation

Telephone No.

0/C    N.R.D.M.S.

03252-223580

District Information & Cultural Officer

Telefax  > 03252-222452

District Statistics Officer

03252-222128

District Science Officer

03252-222688

Sub Divisional Information & Cultural Officer, Raghunathpur

Telefax  > 03251-256111

District Library Officer

03252-224798

Govt. Offices

Designation/ Address

Tel No.

Chairman, Purulia Municipality

03252-222409

District Inspector of Schools (Secondary)

03252-222438

District Inspector of Schools (Primary)

03252-222970

Divisional Forest Officer, Purulia Division

03252-222329

Divisional Forest Officer, Kangsaboti I

03252-222231

Divisional Forest Officer, Kangsaboti II

03252-222604

Executive Engineer, PWD, Purulia Division

03252-222371

Executive Engineer, Irrigation, Purulia Division

03252-222407

Executive Engineer, Planning & Investigation, Purulia

03252-222685

Executive Engineer, Construction (Irrigation), Purulia

03252-222877

Executive Engineer, PWD (Roads), Purulia

03252-223104

Executive Engineer, PHE (Drillings), Purulia Division

03252-222402

Executive Engineer, Agri Irrigation, Purulia Division

03252-222482

Executive Engineer, Agri Mech, Purulia Division

03252-223463

Executive Engineer, PHE, Purulia

03252-222627

Assistant Labour Commissioner, Purulia

03252-222980

Assistant Director of Sericulture

03252-222514

Deputy Director, Veternary Deptt, Purulia

03252-224305

Assistant Director Poultry Farm, Purulia

03252-222752

Superintendent, Ananda Math, Purulia

03252-22463

Principal Agriculture Officer, Purulia

03252-222344

Commercial Tax Officer, Purulia

 

Commercial Tax Officer (Range Officer), Purulia

03252-225179

Income Tax Officer, Purulia

 

Educational Institutions

Principal, J.K. College, Purulia

03252-=222416

Principal, Nistarini College, Purulia

03252-=222064

Principal, J.B.T College, Purulia

03252-=222310

Principal, B-Ed College, Purulia

03252-222323/03252-224798

Headmistress, Govt. Girls High School

03252-=222317

Headmistress, Santamoyee Girls High School

03252-=222507

Headmistress, Chittaranjan Girls High School

03252-=225725

Headmistress, Kasturba Girls High School

03252-=224183

Headmaster, Ramkrishna Mission Vidyapith

03252-=22235
/ Fax 224735

Principal, Sainik School, Purulia

03252-=222467

Headmaster, Purulia Zilla High School

03252-=223296

Headmaster, Manbhum Victoria High School

03252-222288

Headmaster, Chittaranjan Boys’ High School

03252-=222372

Headmaster, M.M. High School

03252-222686

Headmaster, Rajasthan Vidyapith

03252-=222656

Headmaster, Netaji  Vidyapith

03252-225487

Headmaster, Rishi Aravindo Shishu Vidya Pith

 

Principal, Holy Child High School

03252-222778

Principal, St. Xavier High School

03252-228674

Principal, Assembly of God Church High School

03252-222593 / 226868

Shishu Sixa Kendra, Purulia

 

Mono Vikas Kendra, Purulia

 

Principal, Deaf & Dumb School, Purulia

 

Headmaster, Ramkrishana Mission, Purulia

 

Headmaster, Rose Milo School, Purulia

 

Headmaster, Morning Glory School

 

Headmaster, Bal Bharati School, Purulia

 

Headmaster, Ramkrishna Tarak Math High School

 

Headmaster, Girish Vidyapith, Purulia

 

Headmaster, D.A.V. School, Purulia

 

Headmaster, Blind School, Purulia

 

The Judiciary

Designation/ Address

Tel No.

District & Session Judge, Purulia

03252-222339
03252-224264

Additional District & Session Judge I, Purulia

03252-222406

Additional District & Session Judge II, Purulia

03252-222804

Additional District & Session Judge III, Purulia

03252-225935

Additional District & Session Judge (FTC – I), Purulia

03252-280646

Additional District & Session Judge(FTC - III), Purulia

 

Civil Judge (Senior Division), Purulia

 

Judicial Magistrate – I cum Civil Judge (Junior) Division

 

Civil Judge (Junior) Division

 

Judicial Magistrate II

 

Judicial Magistrate – III

 

Judicial Magistrate – III

 

Chief Judicial Magistrate

03252-222571

Registrar, Civil Court

03252-222563

Police

Designation/ Address

Tel No.

Superintendent of Police, Purulia

Office 03252-222304
Res     03252-222303

Additional Superintendent of Police,

Office 03252-223211
Res     03252-223212

Deputy Superintendent of Police, D & T,

03252-223212

Deputy Superintendent of Police, D.E.B,

03252-223215

Deputy Superintendent of Police, Head Quarter

03252-223208

Deputy Superintendent of Police, D.I.B,

03252-223203

Circle Inspector, Sadar

03252-223888

O.C. Watch, Purulia

 

O.C. Purulia Thana (Mufassil)

03252-223205

O.C. Purulia Thana (Townl)

03252-223202

The Reserve Inspector of Police, Belguma,

03252-223207

District Commandant N.V.F. Purulia

 

Rail

Designation/ Address

Tel No.

Railway Enquiry, Purulia

03252-222005

Railway Enquiry, Adra

03251-244213

 Deben Mahato Sadar Hospital


Casualty

03252-222200

Superintendent

03252-222474

Blood Bank

03252-222480

Neo Natal Intensive Care Unit

03252-222433

CMOH Office

03252-222480

Important Contact Numbers S.E. Railway Hospital, Adra

Casualty

03251-245521

CMS Office

03251-244241

Senior D.M.O.

03251-245928

C.M.S.

9434065727

Senior D.M.O.

9434304461

Ambulance Facility at Purulia District

Name of the organization

Vehicle no.

Contact Person

Contact no.

Sadar Hospital

 

Nil

Nil

Indian Red Cross Society

WB37/2377

K.P. Singh Deo
Driver Md Harfed at Sadar Hospital

 

 

WB55/1978

Hemanta Mahato

 

Purulia Municipality

WB55/3036

Chairman/Dr. Jha

223-688 / 222-409 ; 9434015466

Vanus
(Oxygen facility available)

WB56/2810

Secretary, Vanus

222-222

Rotary Club of Purulia

WB55/2534

 

233-620/ 229-474

Bharat Sevashram Sangha

WB55/3464
WB55/3279

Anup Maharaj

222-056

Ramkrishna Memorial Society

 

Shantiram Mahato, MLA, Joypur

223-966
226-578

Deben Mahato Memorial Society

 

Nepal Mahato, MLA, Jhalda

03254-255700

Marwari Yuba Sangha, Jhalda

 

Life Medical, Jhalda

 

Ramkrishna Mission Vidyapith Purulia

 

 

224-408
224-409

Raghunathpur Sub Division

 

Designation/ Address

Tel No.

Sub Divisional Officer, Raghunathpur

Office 03251-255270
Res.   03251-255234

Sub Divisional Police Officer, Raghunathpur

Office 03251-255338
Res.   03251-244503

Sub Divisional Information & Cultural Officer, Raghunathpur

Telefax  > 03251-256111

Sub Divisional Hospital, Raghunathpur

         03251-255208

Chairman, Raghunathpur Municipality

         03251-

Fire Brigade

03251-255283

Administration(Block Level)


Block Name

Phone No.(BDO)

Phone No.(Savapati)

PURULIA 1

03252 – 222893

03252 –224490

PURULIA 2

03252 – 222790

03252 –222476

HURA

03252 – 240223

03252- 240249

PUNCHA

03253- 259207

03253 - 259206

MANBAZAR 1

03253 – 255209

03253 – 255207

MANBAZAR 2

03253 – 284251

 

BANDWAN

03253 – 257202

03253 - 257203

ARSA

03254 - 258017

 

JOYPUR

03254 – 252231

03254 – 252233

JHALDA 1

03254 – 255261

03254 – 255261

JHALDA 2

03254 – 260555

03254 – 260555

BALARAMPUR

03252 –244255

03252 - 244223

BARABAZAR

03253 - 258224

03253 – 258542

BAGMUNDI

03252 – 250207

03252 – 250215

KASHIPUR

03251 - 246238

03251 – 246223

NETURIA

03251 – 264050

 

SANTURI

03251 – 250230

03251 – 250230

RAGHUNATHPUR 1

03251 – 255278

03251 – 255279

RAGHUNATHPUR 2

03251 – 262222

03251 – 262222

PARA

03251 – 266234

03251 - 266660

Police Stations


Police Station

Phone No.

PURULIA  (T)

03252 – 223202

PURULIA  (M)

03252 – 223205

HURA

03252 – 240229

PUNCHA

03253- 259236

BANDWAN

03253 – 257262

MANBAZAR 1

03253 – 255237

MANBAZAR 2

03253 – 252245

ARSA

03254 – 280190

JOYPUR

03254 – 256221

JHALDA 1

03254 – 255233

JHALDA 2

03254 – 255233

BALARAMPUR

03252 –244221

BARABAZAR

03253 – 258235

BAGMUNDI

03252 – 250240

KASHIPUR

03251 – 246222

NETURIA

03251 – 252340

SANTURI

03251 – 250240

RAGHUNATHPUR 1

03251 – 255231

SANTALDIH

03251 – 260235

PARA

03251 – 266330

KENDA

03252 - 284279

 

 

 

Health Profile

Purulia District at a glance:

  
At present District possesses one District Hospital, one Sub-divisional Hospital, one Mental Hospital, one jail Hospital, one Police Hospital,  5 Rural Hospitals / CHC, 15 BPHC, 53 PHC ( 2 PHCs – Chalyanpur (Purulia-II) &  Sidhi (Joypur) are not functional ) and 485 functioning Sub-Centers. At present there are 438 ANM, 193 HA (M), 49 HS(M), 73 HS(F) & 294 2nd ANM. There are 3 vacant Sub-Centers.

 

Total Population : - 2783368
Birth Rate per 1000 population is - 21.32,
Death Rate- per 1000 population - 8.4,
Infant Mortality Rate per 1000 life birth – 38.34 ( As per reported deaths )
Maternal Mortality Rate – 176.38 ( As per reported deaths )
Percentage of eligible couple correctly & effectively protected 51.95

(Source: C.M.O.H Purulia)

 

 

 

 


  

Purulia Tourist Map
 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

Comments

Add comment

Overview of comments

purulia is purulia

(sourav the macho man, 2010-05-03 08:21)

i love p..... bcoz i lived this district.sometimes i go to SUBASH PARK in puru....i study there

Thank You For Loving Purulia

(Rajarshi Chatterjee , 2010-04-19 07:55)

It is a Great initiative-let all the Like minded "Purulia Lovers" come together and form a forum to make Purulia the most sought after destination in the World.

Good Work

(Binay Rungta, 2010-03-26 05:30)

Nice Job and a very good set of information. Thanks for sharing and spending time to provide the information.

Some Information

(Binay Rungta, 2010-03-26 05:28)

Please visit these sites, which may help you to collection more information about purulia.
http://jhalda.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jhalda
http://www.flickr.com/photos/binayrungta
thanks